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Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Max Planck Summer Academy for Legal History 2017

via Nadine Göbel:
Max Planck Summer Academy for Legal History 2017
Special Theme: Conflict Regulation


Date: 25 July - 04 August 2017
Deadline: 31 March 2017


The Course
The Max-Planck Summer Academy for Legal History provides a selected group of highly motivated early-stage graduates, usually PhD candidates, an in-depth introduction to methods and principles of research in legal history.
The academy consists of two parts. The first part provides an introduction to the study of sources, methodological principles, as well as theoretical models and controversial research debates on basic research fields of legal history.
In the second part the participants discuss the special research theme and develop their own approach to the theme.
The course will take place at the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
Special Theme 2017: Conflict Regulation
Conflict is not just a constant challenge for the law, but also a key means of access to its history. Each society develops its own set of means of conflict regulation. The diversity ranges from different forms of dispute resolution and mediation to traditional juridical procedures at local and global level. The way conflicts are regulated reveals the normative options chosen by the parties involved in the conflict. Thus, conflicts and their regulation can provide an insight into local contingencies, traditions, as well as the pragmatic contexts and leading authorities of the law, the living law. Research projects to be presented at the Summer Academy should concentrate on historical mechanisms of conflict regulation and offer a critical reflection about the methods used for analyzing the conflicts and the way they are dealt with.
Eligibility Requirements
• Early-stage graduates, usually PhD candidates
• Working knowledge of English is required, German is not a prerequisite
Application
Required documents for the application are a CV, a project summary (approx. 10 pages) and a letter of motivation.
Fees
There is no participation fee. Accommodation will be provided by the organizers. Participants, however, will be responsible for covering their travel expenses. There will be a limited number of scholarships available.
For further information please visit the Max Planck Summer Academy’s website.
Contact
Max Planck Institute for European Legal History
Dr. Stefanie Rüther, e-mail: summeracademy@rg.mpg.de

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Gossage, "On Dads and Damages: Looking for the “Priceless Child” and the “Manly Modern” in Quebec’s Civil Courts, 1921-1960."

Also in the November 2016 issue of Histoire Sociale/Social History, Peter Gossage has an article, "On Dads and Damages: Looking for the “Priceless Child” and the “Manly Modern” in Quebec’s Civil Courts, 1921-1960."

Here's the abstract:



This essay explores the legal rights and responsibilities of fathers as they were interpreted by Quebec’s civil courts between 1921 and 1960. The focus is on 59 published cases in which fathers were named as plaintiffs or defendants in actions where legal damages were sought in relation to incidents that involved their children, as either victims or authors of harmful acts. These lawsuits are analysed with specific reference to two key concepts, Viviana Zelizer’s Priceless Child (1985) and Christopher Dummitt’s Manly Modern (2007), with the latter found more useful for understanding the changing dynamics of masculine parenthood in this period.

Ce texte traite des droits et responsabilités juridiques des pères tels que les ont interprétés les tribunaux civils du Québec de 1921 à 1960. L’analyse porte sur 59 litiges ayant fait jurisprudence où les pères sont impliqués soit comme demandeurs soit comme défendeurs. Il s’agit de causes dans lesquelles des dommages-intérêts légaux sont réclamés relativement à des incidents impliquant leurs enfants comme victimes ou comme auteurs d’actes préjudiciables. Ces poursuites sont analysées en faisant spécifiquement référence à deux notions clés : celle de Priceless Child, de Viviana Zelizer (1985), et celle de Manly Modern de Christopher Dummitt (2007), cette dernière s’avérant plus utile pour comprendre l’évolution de la dynamique de la parentalité masculine au cours de cette période.

Hamill, "Liquor Laws, Legal Continuity, and Hotel Beer Parlours in Alberta, 1924 to c.1939"

Sarah Hamill has published "Liquor Laws, Legal Continuity, and Hotel Beer Parlours in Alberta, 1924 to c.1939in the November issue of Histoire Sociale/Social History. The article is downloadable from the Histoire Sociale/Social History website, and also through Project Muse.

Here's the abstract:

In common with other Canadian provinces, Alberta introduced a system of government liquor control to replace prohibition. Where Alberta differed was in its simultaneous reintroduction of both liquor stores and licensed premises in the form of beer parlours. Alberta’s beer parlours had a crucial role to play, both in the success of government control and in the broader economic life of the province. The author uses Alberta’s early experiences with government control to explore the role that beer parlours played in the new system. Licensed hotel beer parlours offered the Alberta Liquor Control Board (ALCB) an inexpensive way to allow some form of legal alcohol for sale in most small towns and villages across the province. These beer parlours served to push the population away from illicit liquor sales. At the same time, by locating licensed premises in hotels, the ALCB was also able to monitor hotel standards.

À l’instar d’autres provinces canadiennes, l’Alberta a introduit un mécanisme de régie des alcools par l’État pour remplacer la prohibition. La province s’est néanmoins distinguée par la réintroduction simultanée de magasins d’alcools et de débits de boisson autorisés, les tavernes. Ces tavernes ont eu un rôle essentiel à jouer, tant dans le succès de la réglementation officielle que dans la vie économique de la province au sens large. L’auteure se sert des premières expériences de l’Alberta en matière de réglementation officielle pour étudier le rôle des tavernes dans le nouveau système. Pour l’Alberta Liquor Control Board (ALCB), les tavernes autorisées dans les hôtels ont constitué un moyen peu coûteux de permettre une certaine forme de vente légale d’alcool dans la plupart des petites villes et des villages de la province. Ces tavernes ont servi à détourner la population du commerce illicite de l’alcool. Par ailleurs, en installant les débits de boisson dans les hôtels, l’ALCB était aussi en mesure de surveiller l’application des normes hôtelières.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

CFP/Appel: Power, Politics, and the State in Canadian History: Confederation and Beyond @ UBC


via H-Net:

CFP/Appel: Power, Politics, and the State in Canadian History: Confederation and Beyond @ UBC

by Bradley Miller
Power, Politics, and the State in Canadian History: Confederation and Beyond
29 and 30 September 2017
Liu Institute for Global Issues
The University of British Columbia – Vancouver
After more than a decade of discussion about the “new” Canadian political history, scholars remain divided over what this field means, where it should go in the future, and even whether it exists at all. But in the midst of this debate, recent work has explored the broader social, cultural, imperial, and transnational contexts in which Canadian government institutions, political ideas, and legal regimes took shape, as well as the intersections of governance and ordinary life. Still “new” or not, this discipline is thriving, and the Canadian Political History Group feels that the time is right to examine what has been accomplished and what should come next for the field. In other words, the sesquicentennial of 1867 is an opportunity to talk about more than just Confederation.
Hosted by the Political History Group at the Liu Institute for Global Issues at UBC-Vancouver, this two-day conference will bring together historians working on an array of periods, places, and themes to debate and discuss the state of the discipline, to showcase new methodologies and approaches, and to strategize about future projects and lines of inquiry.
We invite proposals for 15-minute presentations on topics including but not limited to:
-the field of Canadian political history
-politics in social context
-Indigenous governance and activism
-crime and punishment
-settler colonialism and state formation
-imperial power and Canada
-constitutionalism
-the state and social welfare
-Confederation and its contexts
-human rights and civil liberties
-political parties and democratization
Deadline for Proposal Submissions: 3 March 2017
Please email submissions to politicalhistoryconference@gmail.com
For more information, please contact Bradley Miller (brmiller@mail.ubc.ca) or Penny Bryden (pbryden@uvic.ca)
Organizing Committee
Penny Bryden (University of Victoria) & Bradley Miller (University of British Columbia), chairs
Michel Ducharme (University of British Columbia)
Denis McKim (Douglas College)
Robert A.J. McDonald (University of British Columbia)
Steven H. Lee (University of British Columbia)
Katrina Ackerman (University of Regina)
Adam Coombs (University of British Columbia)
Della Roussin (York University)
Pouvoir, politique et État en histoire canadienne : Allez au-delà de la Confédération
Les 29-30 septembre 2017
Liu Institute for Global Issues
The University of British Columbia – Vancouver
Après plus d’une décennie de discussions et de débats entourant la « nouvelle » histoire politique au Canada, les historiennes et les historiens demeurent divisés quant à la définition à donner à ce champ d’étude ainsi qu’à la manière dont il devrait évoluer, certains allant jusqu’à remettre en cause son existence. Quoi qu’il en soit, il est indéniable qu’au cours des dernières années, les historiennes et les historiens ont analysé le développement des institutions gouvernementales, la dissémination des idées politiques ainsi que l’évolution des régimes juridiques au Canada en les intégrant dans des contextes sociaux, culturels, impériaux et transnationaux plus généraux qu’auparavant. Ils se sont également intéressés aux relations entre l’autorité gouvernementale et la vie quotidienne des citoyennes et des citoyens. Ainsi, qu’elle soit nouvelle ou non, l’histoire politique canadienne se porte bien. Partant de ce postulat, le Groupe d’histoire politique considère qu’il est temps d’examiner le travail qui a été accompli et celui qui reste à faire, bref de profiter du cent-cinquantième anniversaire de la Confédération pour explorer bien plus que l’Acte de l’Amérique du Nord britannique comme tel.
Le Groupe d’histoire politique convie donc les historiennes et les historiens à une conférence de deux jours qui se tiendra au Liu Institute for Global Issues de UBC-Vancouver. À cette occasion, les participantes et les participants discuteront d’une variété de thèmes couvrant différentes périodes chronologiques et régions géographiques, débattront de l’état de la discipline, aborderons de nouvelles approches et méthodologies pour finalement discuter de nouvelles questions de recherche et esquisser de nouveaux projets.
Les historiennes et les historiens intéressés à participer à cette conférence sont invités à soumettre au comité organisateur des propositions de communication d’une durée de 15 minutes portant, par exemple, sur :
- le champ d’étude en histoire politique canadienne
- le contexte social au sein duquel la vie politique canadienne s’est inscrite
- la gouvernance et le militantisme des peuples autochtones
- la criminalité et le système judiciaire et pénal
- la colonisation et la formation de l’État
- le pouvoir impérial et le Canada
- le constitutionnalisme
- le rôle de l’État au sein de l’État-providence
- le contexte général qui a mené à la Confédération
- les droits de l’homme et les libertés civiles
- les partis politiques et la démocratie
Date limite pour soumettre une proposition de communication: le 3 mars 2017
Veuillez envoyer vos soumissions par courriel à l’adresse suivante : politicalhistoryconference@gmail.com
Pour plus d'information veuillez contacter Bradley Miller (brmiller@mail.ubc.ca) or Penny Bryden (pbryden@uvic.ca)
Comité organisateur
Penny Bryden (University of Victoria) & Bradley Miller (University of British Columbia), chairs
Michel Ducharme (University of British Columbia)
Denis McKim (Douglas College)
Robert A.J. McDonald (University of British Columbia)
Steven H. Lee (University of British Columbia)
Katrina Ackerman (University of Regina)
Adam Coombs (University of British Columbia)
Della Roussin (York University)

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Call for Applications: Post-Doc at UNB

The Faculty of Arts at the University of New Brunswick is accepting applications for twelve-month post-doctoral fellowship beginning 1 July 2017.  This postdoc is in conjunction with a SSHRC-funded Partnership Development Grant on “Unrest, Violence and the Search for Social Order in British North America and Canada, 1749-1878” and the Canada Research Chair in Atlantic Canada Studies.  The fellow’s primary responsibilities will be two-fold:  1) work on a research project that is relevant to the theme of unrest, violence, and social order in British North America, ca. 1749-1876 [2/3 time]; and 2) work with the co-partners on the grant – Elizabeth Mancke (UNB), Jerry Bannister (Dalhousie University), Scott See (University of Maine), and Denis McKim (Douglas College) to edit a volume of essays coming out of a workshop on this theme [1/3 time].  At UNB, the fellow will be affiliated with Elizabeth Mancke, CRC in Atlantic Canada Studies, the Atlantic Canada Studies Centre, and the Department of History.  The compensation is $40,500.
Potential candidates must be within three years of receiving their PhD and must have their PhD completed by 1 June 2017. Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, a letter of application that includes a statement of their research program, and arrange to have three letters of recommendations sent by 15 March 2017 to:
Professor Elizabeth Mancke
P.O. Box 4400
Department of History
University of New Brunswick
Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3

Electronic submissions are accepted:  emancke@unb.ca.


The University of New Brunswick is committed to employment equity and encourages applications from qualified women and men, visible minorities, aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.


Contact:Professor Elizabeth Mancke
P.O. Box 4400
Department of History
University of New Brunswick
Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3

Electronic submissions are accepted:  emancke@unb.ca.
Website:http://www.unb.ca/fredericton/arts/departments/history/
Primary Category:Canadian History / Studies
Secondary Categories:None
Posting Date:01/20/2017
Closing Date02/16/2017

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Legal history of Great Lakes in The Canadian Geographer/Le géographe

via H-Net:

The latest issue of The Canadian Geographer/ Le géographe canadien (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cag.v60.4/issuetoc) contains a special section which presents the results of collective research on the historical process of defining the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.

Author : Michèle Dagenais

Authors : Michèle Dagenais and Ken Cruikshank

Author : Stéphane Castonguay

Author : Jamie Benidickson

Authors : William Knight and Stephen Bocking

2017 Osgoode Society optional book: An Exceptional Law: Section 98 and the Emergency State, 1919-1936

The "optional extra" book from the Osgoode Society, to be published this year in conjunction with the U of T Press, is An Exceptional Law: Section 98 and the Emergency State, 1919-1936

Section 98 of the Criminal Code of Canada was passed in 1919 following the Winnipeg general strike as a law aimed at ‘unlawful associations.’ Its very broad definition of unlawful association meant that it could be used against a wide variety of opponents of the status quo, including the Communist Party of Canada, left-leaning organisations of various kinds, and labour leaders.

Although it was justified as part of the state’s ‘emergency powers,’ it became, Molinaro argues, ‘normalised’, part of the ordinary fabric of mainstream society’s approach to dissent. Like other recent Osgoode Society publications, especially Security, Dissent and the Limits of Toleration in War and Peace: Canadian State Trials Volume IV, 1914-1939,  An Exceptional Law provides a deeply-researched historical account of a current much-debated question – where is the line between freedom and security to be drawn in a liberal democracy?