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Monday, September 16, 2019

Legal history evening for professionals


THE OSGOODE SOCIETY FOR CANADIAN LEGAL HISTORY
Established in 1979, the Osgoode Society publishes books on Canadian legal history and maintains an oral history archive.  

An Evening of Canadian Legal History

Join us for an Evening Session of Legal History for Legal Professionals

On October 28th Professor Jim Phillips, Osgoode Society Editor-in-Chief,  will present the next lecture in our Canadian legal history lecture series. 

No Thought of Reconciliation:
The New Dominion and the Indian Acts,1867-1914
 
Monday October 28th at 5:30 p.m
WeirFoulds LLP 
66 Wellington St.W. - 41st Floor 
 

At Confederation there was very little colonial legislation about indigenous peoples. The first federal legislation on the subject was passed in 1868, and Parliament augmented that more than two dozen times between then and 1914. The major statute was the Indian Act of 1876, but it was continually amended over the ensuing decades. Professor Phillips will discuss the major policy goals of this legislative output, which was principally aimed at assimilating indigenous peoples into settler ways of life and culture. He will also sketch out the reactions of the indigenous people themselves to these legislative efforts to undermine and eventually destroy indigenous culture. 


Professor Jim Phillips, Osgoode Society Editor-in-Chief
 
* approval pending for 60 minutes EDI Professionalism Credit from the Law Society for Ontario.


SPACE IS LIMITED, SO PLEASE REGISTER BY OCTOBER 21.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT IS FOR OSGOODE SOCIETY MEMBERS ONLY. IF YOU HAVE NOT RENEWED YOUR MEMBERSHIP, YOU WILL NEED TO DO SO BEFORE YOU CAN REGISTER. 

REGISTER HERE

YOU CAN ALSO REGISTER BY PHONE AT 416-947-3321 OR VIA E-MAIL


Benefits of Membership:
  • 2019 members book, which will is Connecting the Dots: The Life of an Academic Lawyer by Harry Arthurs
  • Lectures and Events
  • Quarterly newsletter with information on the Osgoode Society and Canadian legal history.




Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Justice Sharpe qua historian interviewed regarding the Lazier Murder

Fans of Justice Robert Sharpe's legal history work will be interested in this OBA interview with him about the Lazier Murder, a cause célèbre of late nineteenth century rural Ontario (h/t Amanda Campbell.)

https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/oba-presents-holiday-hours-a-new-cpd-ucrNdLx3voS/

If the interviews spark your interest in Justice Sharpe's book on the case, take a look at the entry on the Osgoode Society website.

Robert Sharpe is one of the Osgoode Society’s most prolific authors, and his latest offering is a compelling account of a late nineteenth century murder case in Picton, Ontario.  This very thoroughly researched and engagingly written case study details the murder of a local resident and the subsequent court and governmental proceedings. What emerges is a fascinating insight into the operation of the policing, prosecution and trial processes of late nineteenth century Ontario, one that shows how much public opinion and courtroom atmosphere could at times affect the outcome of a trial. The Lazier Murder also looks at the executive commutation process by which it was decided if those sentenced to be executed would be hanged. Sharpe’s account  suggests that this may well have been a case of what we would now call a ‘wrongful conviction.’

Sunday, August 11, 2019

*Updated* Osgoode Society Legal History Workshop fall 2019

*Revised 10 August 2019*

OSGOODE SOCIETY LEGAL HISTORY WORKSHOP, 2019-2020:

FALL TERM 2019

Wednesday September 11: Nancy Wright, University of Victoria: “The Laphroaig
Leasehold:  Popular Interpretations of Feudal Tenures.” 

Wednesday September 25: Jim Phillips, University of Toronto: ‘The Canadian
Court System, 1867-1914’

Wednesday October 9 – Yom Kippur

Tuesday October 15: Note the Tuesday. Donal Coffey, Max Planck Institute:
‘Newfoundland and Dominion Status.’

Wednesday October 30  (new date): Philip Girard, Osgoode Hall Law School: ‘The
Contrasting Fates of French-Canadian and Indigenous Constitutionalism: British
North America, 1763-1867.’

Wednesday November 6: Eric Adams, University of Alberta: ‘Constitutional
Wrongs: A Legal History of Japanese Canadians’

Wednesday November 13 (new date): Joseph Kary, Kary and Kwan: Sonderkommando in
Canada: Montreal's first World War II War Crimes Trial, 1951-1956

Wednesday November 27: Patricia McMahon, Torys: ‘Radioactive: The Life and
Lies of Boris Pregel’

Friday, August 9, 2019

Osgoode Society Legal History Workshop--Fall 2019 Schedule



OSGOODE SOCIETY LEGAL HISTORY WORKSHOP, 2019-2020:

FALL TERM 2019

Starting is 6.30 as usual at U of T Law School, room to be announced. 
If you would like to be put on the list for announcements and to receive copies of the papers to be presented, please email j.phillips@utoronto.ca

Wednesday September 11: Nancy Wright, University of Victoria: 'The Laphroaig
Leasehold:  Popular Interpretations of Feudal Tenures'

Wednesday September 25: Jim Phillips, University of Toronto: ‘The Canadian
Court System, 1867-1914’

Wednesday October 9 – Yom Kippur, no session

Tuesday October 15: (Note that it's Tuesday, not Wednesday) Donal Coffey, Max Planck Institute:
‘Newfoundland and Dominion Status.’

Wednesday October 30: Joseph Kary, Kary and Kwan: 'Sonderkommando in
Canada: Montreal's first World War II War Crimes Trial, 1951-1956'

Wednesday November 6: Eric Adams, University of Alberta: ‘Constitutional
Wrongs: A Legal History of Japanese Canadians’

Wednesday November 13: Philip Girard, Osgoode Hall Law School: ‘The
Contrasting Fates of French-Canadian and Indigenous Constitutionalism: British
North America, 1763-1867’

Wednesday November 27: Patricia McMahon, Torys: ‘Radioactive: The Life and
Lies of Boris Pregel’

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Torrie, "Farm Debt Compromises During the Great Depression: An Empirical Study of Applications made under the Farmers’ Creditors Arrangement Act in Morden and Brandon, Manitoba" on SSRN

Virginia Torrie of the University of Manitoba Law School has posted "Farm Debt Compromises During the Great Depression: An Empirical Study of Applications made under the Farmers’ Creditors Arrangement Act in Morden and Brandon, Manitoba" on SSRN. The article also appears in volume 41, issue 1 (2018) of the Manitoba Law Journal. [This journal is open access.]

This article presents the results of an empirical study of the Farmers’ Creditors Arrangement Act (FCAA) in Morden and Brandon, Manitoba. Parliament enacted this federal insolvency statute to address the agricultural crisis of the 1930s colloquially known as the “Dust Bowl”. The express purpose of the Act was to “keep the farmer on the farm” by reducing debts to an amount that the farmer could afford to pay. This is the first article to engage in a substantive analysis of the FCAA, and it employs a novel methodology for studying farm debt compromises under the Act. This study uncovers notable differences in the way that FCAA applications played out in Morden and Brandon. It reveals that much farm credit was obtained locally, with roughly half of all claims being owed to individuals or estates, which in many instances were the mortgage lender. In addition, medical debts listed the FCAA files call attention to the privation of the “Dirty Thirties” and the financial costs born by individuals for medical care in the pre-public health care era. The empirical findings of this study thus add to historical scholarship about the experience of the Great Depression on the Canadian Prairies by shedding light on the social context of debtor-creditor relations in farming communities, and highlighting regional variations in the application of a federal law designed to help address the farm debt crisis.

Call for presenters: Osgoode Society Toronto Legal History workshop Fall term


Jim Phillips advises that he has four sessions lined up with presenters for the fall for the legal history workshop.
We still have some spots open.
If you, or some one you know, is an academic (any department) either a faculty member, independent scholar or grad student, who is studying a legal history topic (also any geographic area and time period) who would be interested in presenting a work-in-progress to the legal history workshop (held at U of T Law School every other Wednesday evening--more or less) please email Jim at j.phillips@utoronto.ca.
And anyone who would like to receive the papers and attend some or any sessions, please also email Jim to be added to the distribution list.