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Monday, June 13, 2011

Osgoode Society award winners announced

From the news release today:

The Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History is honouring three academics at a special ceremony on June 21, in recognition of the recent contributions they have made to furthering Canadians' understanding of the country's legal history.

At the Osgoode Society’s annual meeting, the following three awards will be presented: the R. Roy McMurtry Fellowship in Legal History, the Peter Oliver Prize in Canadian Legal History and the John T. Saywell Prize for Canadian Constitutional Legal History.

The 2011 winner of the R. Roy McMurtry Fellowship in Legal History is Daniel Rueck, a McGill University Ph.D. candidate who will soon be a visiting scholar at the University of Western Ontario. During the fellowship, Mr. Rueck will continue researching Mohawk systems of land tenure and land use in Kahnawake during the nineteenth century. Mr. Rueck’s research project is of both great historical and contemporary interest, given current debates surrounding the privatization of Aboriginal land.

The 2011 winner of the Peter Oliver Prize in Canadian Legal History is Jonathon Penney, a doctoral student at Balliol College, Oxford. Mr. Penney is recognized for his article Ivan Rand’s Ancient Constitutionalism, published in 2010 (University of New Brunswick Law Journal Vol. 61 No. 1). The article provides considerable context and insight about Justice Ivan Rand’s groundbreaking civil rights decisions of the 1950s.

The 2011 winner of the John T. Saywell Prize for Canadian Constitutional Legal History is Douglas Harris of the University of British Columbia. Professor Harris is recognized for his book, Landing Native Fisheries: Indian Reserves and Fishing Rights in British Columbia, 1849-1925, published by the University of British Columbia Press. Professor Harris’ writing draws on an impressive range of sources to demonstrate the unique and crucial relationship between reserves and fishing rights in British Columbia. Through his book, Professor Harris furthers understanding around Aboriginal rights, federalism and the intra-agency conflicts that exist between federal government officials concerned with Indian affairs and those concerned with fisheries.

The annual meeting will also feature a talk by The Honourable Robert Sharpe on his forthcoming book to be published by the Osgoode Society The Lazier Murder: Prince Edward County, 1884.
For more information, please contact: Marilyn MacFarlane, Administrator, The Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History at (416) 947- 3321 or mmacfarl@lsuc.on.ca

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